Soft, chewy fig cookies

Figgy Swirl Cookies

Figgy Swirl Cookies are an AIP/Paleo version of those fig cookies we knew as children, just a little fancier. They are soooo yummy!

Soft, chewy fig cookies
Figgy Swirl Cookies (AIP/Paleo)
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This week, I am celebrating my blog-a-versary. 🎉🥳🎉 You and I have been sharing these recipes for two years now. Last year, I shared the recipe for Black Forest Cake as a way to celebrate. This year, I’m sharing another special something – Figgy Swirl Cookies! In fact, I’ve been saving this recipe for just this occasion.

So what are they?

When I was growing up, Fig Newtons were a huge treat. I loved them! I didn’t know that I was eating fruit. I just tasted “cookie.” (Wouldn’t it be great to bottle that taste…?) I wanted to create something similar, but without any unpleasant chemicals, preservatives, yadda-yadda. This is what sprang from that creative space in my brain.

Baking with AIP ingredients

I hold my breath a little every time I share with you an AIP baking recipe. The ingredients are “fussy,” and if we live in different climates, the result you get may be different than mine. I’m measuring the cassava flour with the spoon-level-pour method, and I only use Otto’s Cassava Flour . If you use this method and flour, we have a better chance of getting the same cookie to come out of the oven.

Collage of how to cut the roll cookie with baker's twine

Roll cookie cutting method

For best results, use baker’s twine or plain, unflavored, unwaxed dental floss to cut these cookies from the roll as shown in the photo. (I’ll explain how to do that in the recipe.) You could cut them with a knife, but they will squish and be misshapen. Cutting with twine ensures that your cookies will be round.

As I celebrate my second year of blogging, I have so much gratitude for you. Thank you for coming on this journey with me. Thank you for reading these recipes, trying them, and making them part of your healing. It is an honor to be here with you.

Happy blog-a-versary to us, friend!

💗,

Wendi

Figgy Swirl Cookies

Recipe by Wendi’s AIP Kitchen – www.wendisaipkitchen.comCourse: DessertCuisine: AIP, PaleoDifficulty: Medium
Servings

13

servings
Prep time

50

minutes
Cooking time

10

minutes

Figgy Swirl Cookies are an AIP/Paleo version of those fig cookies we knew as children, just a little fancier. They are soooo yummy!

Ingredients

Directions

  • Preheat oven to 350 degrees F. In a large mixing bowl, cream the shortening.
  • Add 2 tablespoons honey, vanilla and orange zest. Cream again.
  • In a small bowl, sprinkle gelatin over 1 tablespoon warm water. Mix gently. Add 2 tablespoons hot water and whisk vigorously. Add immediately to the shortening mixture, and cream it all together.
  • In a separate bowl, mix flour, baking soda, cream of tartar and salt. Add this mixture to the shortening and stir to form a dough. At this point, your dough should not be sticky to the touch. If the dough is too wet, add more flour, tablespoon at a time, until you get a dough that will stick well to itself, but not to you!
  • In a mini food processor or blender, whirl figs, 1 tablespoon honey, and orange juice until it is a paste.
  • On a piece of parchment paper, press the dough into a 5″ X 7″ rectangle with your hands. Spread fig mixture onto dough, leaving a 1/4″ edge. Carefully roll dough lengthwise. (If cracks appear, and they probably will, don’t fret. Gently roll the log a bit. This helps seal the cracks.)
  • Slide a length of baker’s twine or unflavored, unwaxed dental floss under the log 1/2″ from the top. Cross the twine, then pull the ends. This will cut off cookies without smashing the log. (See photo above in blog.)
  • Place cookie on parchment-lined cookie sheet. Repeat at the next 1/2″ until all cookies are on the sheet. Bake for 10 minutes. Store in an airtight container.

Notes

  • * Since I’m not measuring by weight, your results may be different. You may need more or less flour. See instructions.
  • **For elimination phase of AIP, choose dried figs without any sunflower oil, etc. I was able to find just plain dried figs at Whole Foods.
  • Makes baker’s dozen. 🙂

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6 Comments

  1. I made these yesterday and they are very good. However, 1/2 t salt was way too much for me. I actually had to add more honey to the dough to balance the saltiness.
    I also use a different brand of cassava floor that tends to be more gummy, so I replaced 2 T of cassava with tigernut flour to prevent that.
    Thank you!

    • Hi, Elizabeth! You win the prize for being the first person to make these and report back. Woo hoo! 😁 So a couple of things that might help:
      1.) Try using Otto’s cassava flour. They’re not paying me to say that. I just really like them the best for purity and consistency.
      2.) I have found a weird phenomenon that sometimes happens with recipes made with cassava flour. They can have a salty taste – sort of even baking soda-y – even with my fave Otto’s. I have no idea why this is. As I think about it 1/2 tsp of salt spread out over thirteen cookies seems a pretty nominal amount, but everyone has their own tastes when it comes to salt. Maybe if you try Otto’s, and cut the salt in half it will work for you.

      Kudos to you for being the FIRST! 🎉 Thanks for reporting back!

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  3. Could dried apricots be substituted for the figs?

    • That’s a good question. I’ve usually found dried apricots to be a little too hard to process into something smooth enough to spread. Since I’ve never tried it, though, I can only tell you to try it and see what happens! I’m all about experimenting in the kitchen!

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