Banana Carob Swirl Muffins

Banana Carob Swirl Muffins (AIP/Paleo) are a real treat for those on a healing diet! Satisfy your sweet tooth a bit without derailing your diet.

Banana Carob Swirl muffins cut open to show crumb
Banana Carob Swirl Muffins (AIP/Paleo)
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Baking on the AIP requires some serious alchemy.  I mean, really.  Baking without the benefit of eggs, sugar, or a gluten flour?  As we say in the south, “I tell you what.

Nearly impossible.

Half of a banana carob swirl muffin showing crumb and swirl
Banana Carob Swirl Muffins (AIP/Paleo)

Nearly.

But because I love you, I’ve conjured up this recipe that I hope will satisfy your hankering for a little baked something.  These get eaten very quickly in our house, despite being void of the usual baking ingredients.  They are great as a little bite of happiness on your breakfast plate, or as a dessert.  I hope you enjoy them.  Happy baking!

💗,

Wendi

P.S. You can also try my Banana Blueberry Muffins for something a little different!

***EDIT: I wrote this recipe before I wholly understood the difference between collagen gelatin. The cans of the brand that I use both say gelatin on them! I contacted the company, and they explained that collagen can be used both hot and cold, but it doesn’t hold things together like gelatin does. Therefore, you may not need the collagen in here at all. A friend of this blog reported back to me that these work just fine without. So there ya go.

Banana Carob Swirl Muffins

Recipe by Wendi’s AIP Kitchen – www.wendisaipkitchen.comCourse: Breakfast, DessertCuisine: AIP, PaleoDifficulty: Easy
Servings

6

servings
Prep time

20

minutes
Cooking time

20

minutes

Banana Carob Swirl Muffins (AIP/Paleo) are a real treat for those on a healing diet! Satisfy your sweet tooth a bit without derailing your diet.

Ingredients

  • 1 C. mashed ripe banana

  • 1/4 C. full fat coconut milk

  • 1 T. + 1 T. pure maple syrup

  • 1/4 C. cassava flour

  • 1/4 C. arrowroot flour

  • 1/4 C. coconut flour

  • 1/2 t. sea salt

  • 1 t. baking soda

  • 1/4 t. cream of tartar

  • 1/2 T. collagen  (I use Great Lakes) ***SEE EDIT BELOW

  • 1 T.  carob powder

Directions

  • Preheat oven to 350 degrees.  Line six places in a muffin tin.  (I like to use silicone liners.)
  • In a small-ish bowl, combine banana, coconut milk, and one tablespoon of the maple syrup.
  • In a separate mixing bowl, combine flours, salt, baking soda, cream of tartar and collagen.
  • Add banana mixture to the dry mixture.  Stir.  At this point, you will have something that resembles a cross between a batter and dough.  Don’t freak.  It’s ok.
  • Remove 1/2 cup of this stuff, and return it to the small bowl.  Add the carob powder and the other tablespoon of maple syrup.  Stir to combine.
  • Divide the plain batter evenly between the six liners. Carefully spoon out a glob of the carob mixture onto each of the plain globs.
  • Using a table knife, “slice” through each muffin at the halfway point and turn it over to create a swirl.  Don’t over-mix, or you’ll get a muddy looking, yucky thing.  We want to keep the swirl effect so we can be all Martha Stewart up in here.  Smooth out the top of each muffin with the knife as if you were frosting it.
  • Bake for 20 minutes, or until a toothpick inserted in the center of a muffin comes out clean.

Notes

  • The texture will be better once the muffins have fully cooled.  It can have a mushy mouth feel when warm – unlike real baked goods, which I miss with all my heart.    Waaaaaaaahhhhhhhh!!!  Did that just come out?  Sorry.  Carry on.
  • ***EDIT: I wrote this recipe before I wholly understood the difference between collagen gelatin. The cans of the brand that I use both say gelatin on them! I contacted the company, and they explained that collagen can be used both hot and cold, but it doesn’t hold things together like gelatin does. Therefore, you may not need the collagen in here at all. A friend of this blog reported back to me that these work just fine without. So there ya go.

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12 Comments

  1. I would like yo make these, but confused by gteen can gelatin. I’m under the impression the red can for gelatin eggs, baked goods. The green for extra protien in hot/cold drinks. Are you adding just for callogen benefits & not for egg?

    • Hi! Yes, the whole green can vs. red can thing is confusing to me, too. I got the green can since it can be used both hot and cold. Versatile. I use it in my smoothies, but also in my baked goods. It has worked for me. In this recipe, the gelatin holds it all together. I’ve never bought the red can. If you try this recipe with the red can, please let me know the result! Thanks for the question! 😊

      • Looks like another good recipe but I really hope you’ll edit the recipe to indicate that this is collagen and NOT gelatin that you’re using. The results will truly be different if you’re telling folks to use gelatin when you in fact mean collagen. 🙁

      • Hey there! OK, so I’ve been inspired by your comment to do some research. I will edit the recipe to make it clearer that I’m using collagen. There is so much confusion around this! The green can clearly says “Great Lakes Gelatin” AND collagen. So I called the company to get the scoop. You are absolutely correct that there is a difference in how they behave. I will correct the recipe, and also share what I’ve learned in my social platforms. Thanks for following! 😊

  2. Just made these muffins today for the first time and they were delicious!! It is the first AIP dessert that I have really loved the flavor of and didn’t make me miss pre-AIP desserts. My husband loves them too, I will double the recipe next time for sure! Thanks for sharing this!!!

  3. Pingback: 27 Marvelous AIP Muffin Recipes

  4. Wendi
    I’m sitting here pinning away at many of your recipes. They all sound delicious.
    Your banana carob muffins are one I would love to try. As I have sensitivities to coconut,
    can you recommend sibstitutes for the coconut milk and coconut flour?
    I’m sure the quality may suffer a bit, but these sound just great.
    Do you think “Ripple” pea protein vanilla flavored/unsweetened would replace the
    Coconut milk? It has a thick creamy consistency. But I’m really stumped on the coconut flour!

    • Hi, Pat! Oh, I’m sorry you’re one of the people affected by coconut. That’s really tough on the AIP! About those muffins… I tried MANY incarnations of this recipe, and they all ended up in the trash until I added the coconut flour. Every other time, I ended up with a gross, gummy texture. Please let me save you the heartache I went through! This one really needs the coconut flour. HOWEVER, my friend, Jaime Hartman (Gutsy By Nature) has a recipe for carob brownie-type bars that uses tigernut flour. Maybe that will work for you? Here’s the link: https://gutsybynature.com/2018/04/24/fudgy-banana-bars-paleo-aip-vegan/. Also, THANK YOU for pinning! And for visiting! And for the encouraging words! We all need ‘em. Best of luck! 💗, Wendi

      • Wendi
        Thank you for taking your time to answer my question! I so appreciate it.
        I will take a look at the link you sent….sounds inviting!
        As I stated before, I pinned several other recipes. I will let you know how well I do!
        Haha!

        Happy Day!
        Pat

  5. Do you think cassava can be replaced by tigernut? Cassava flour is difficult to find commonly in Australia.

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